Yes. Juicing is not appropriate for everyone. For example, if you have diabetes or kidney disease, you may need to limit, or monitor your intake of certain nutrients such as carbohydrates, potassium or phosphorus, and adding certain fruits or vegetables may not be recommended. For example, fruits such as melon and banana are high in potassium, and someone with kidney disease may be instructed to avoid these foods. Also, a juice made of mostly fruits can be high in carbohydrates, and could cause a rise in blood sugar, which could be problematic, especially in diabetics. In addition, juicing may also be a source of considerable calories, depending on the size, and content of the juice you make. Consuming excess calories can lead to weight gain, which can increase risk of developing chronic diseases such as heart disease and type 2 diabetes. Talk to your doctor, registered dietitian, or other healthcare professional to help you determine if juicing is a healthy option for you.
Kale: Some of the hottest nutrients present in kale include the glucosinolates and methyl cysteine sulfoxides (11).  These super-nutrients help to activate detoxifying enzymes in the liver that play an important role in neutralizing carcinogenic substances.  One such glucosinolate, sulfuraphane, is formed when kale is either chopped or chewed. Sulfuraphane has been shown to alter the genetic expression of the liver allowing to more effectively use its detoxification enzymes (12).

No. Juicing can be a good way to introduce new fruits and vegetables, but a diet containing only these ingredients is missing some major nutrients. For example, protein and fat will only be present in very small amounts, so they will need to be obtained from other foods. Important vitamins and minerals like vitamin D, calcium, and iron may also be lacking. In addition, the amount of fiber may be reduced if the skin and pulp are removed in the juicing process. If you choose to juice, incorporate it into a healthy eating plan that includes foods from a variety of sources such as whole grains, fat-free or low-fat milk and milk products, and protein foods. You can read more about building a healthy eating pattern in Let's Eat for the Health of it [PDF|968 KB].
Brimming with vitamins! Bursting with energy! Store shelves are exploding with colorful, cleverly named drinks that sound healthy but are actually just sweetened water. Don't let the labels fool you, Berman says. If it's not plain H2O or regular coffee or tea, it's a treat. For a healthier sip, try lemon or mint iced tea or sparkling water with a splash of juice.
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The Dietary Guidelines state that that intake of at least 2 ½ cups of vegetables and fruits per day is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. In addition, fruits and vegetables contain more fiber when eaten whole, which may reduce your risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Fiber can also play a role in providing a feeling of fullness, and promoting healthy laxation. Most Americans don’t consume enough dietary fiber, and should increase their consumption of whole fruits and vegetables to help meet the recommendation for fiber. Since juicing fruits and vegetables can sometimes remove some of the fiber, it is not clear what the relationship is between juicing and health. If you choose to juice, try adding the leftover pulp from your juice to soups or muffins to help add the fiber into your diet.
For many people, food is a chore, a challenge, even a source of dread, as they try to overcome poor eating habits. But eating should be a joy and a centerpiece of family life. Many cultures around the world emphasize the enjoyment of food, which includes cooking and eating with others, as an integral component of good health. The latest Dietary Guidelines say that eating healthfully involves “enjoying food and celebrating cultural and personal traditions through food.” According to some research, shared mealtimes, especially during childhood, may help protect against nutrition-related health problems as well as increase prosocial behavior in adulthood.
Schedule it.  For the first month, you have to work your meal prep into your routine, so it is smart to schedule off a block of time dedicated to your meal prep. Set a reminder in your phone. At first you might feel like it’s a chore, but I’m betting once you get going, and you see how AWESOME it is to not have to worry about your meals during the week, you’ll look forward to it!
You guys have been asking for meal preps that use the same ingredients to make different meals, so I am hooking you up with 5 healthy weight loss meal prep recipes using the same 10 fresh ingredients. I have all the meals covered in this weight loss recipe, breakfast, lunch, and dinner. All of the weight loss recipes are big on flavor and easy to make.
What is moderation? In essence, it means eating only as much food as your body needs. You should feel satisfied at the end of a meal, but not stuffed. For many of us, moderation means eating less than we do now. But it doesn’t mean eliminating the foods you love. Eating bacon for breakfast once a week, for example, could be considered moderation if you follow it with a healthy lunch and dinner—but not if you follow it with a box of donuts and a sausage pizza.
Most “normal” juices also often lack any healthy fats, another key macronutrient for sustained energy, hormone precursors, cell membranes and both gut and joint integrity. Fat is what allows your body to transport vitamins A, D, E and K – all key fat-soluble vitamins necessary for cell membrane formation, steroid and hormone building, bone health and nervous system activity. These same fat soluble vitamins also assist with key metabolic functions, including the regulation of blood pressure and heart rate.
The idea of this meal plan is for you to focus on enjoying your food and having meals prepped for you that you know are well-balanced so you don’t have to worry about counting calories. I find calorie counting to be tedious and I get overly obsessive so I like to choose meals that are naturally healthy and nutritious to add into my meal preps like the recipes I’ve chosen for you today.

I'm a fun-loving, 20-something girl about town living in the heart of the city, planning my life one meal at a time. Case in point: I'm obsessed with coffee, coconut and anything spicy, and consider a weekend well-spent if there's lots of good food and drink to go around. A proud Torontonian at heart, I'm a lover of all things lifestyle, am a University of Toronto graduate, and have a Masters degree in Journalism from Ryerson University. My favourite hobbies include listening to CBC radio, and cooking up a storm in my tiny city kitchen!
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Prepare more of your own meals. Cooking more meals at home can help you take charge of what you’re eating and better monitor exactly what goes into your food. You’ll eat fewer calories and avoid the chemical additives, added sugar, and unhealthy fats of packaged and takeout foods that can leave you feeling tired, bloated, and irritable, and exacerbate symptoms of depression, stress, and anxiety.
Juice separates the juice from the pulp whereas a smoothie includes everything. The pulp is full of nutrients so it stands to reason that smoothies contain more nutrients. This oft-argued point is not necessarily true, because the high powered machine that makes a smoothie adds heat and oxygen which actually destroys some nutrients. So the difference in nutritional richness between a smoothie and a juice is not worth arguing. They are both worlds better than anything bottled or canned!
When the tongue recognizes the bitter flavor it sets off a set of reactions in the neuroendocrine system that is labeled the “bitter reflex.” This process is mediated by the hormone within the stomach called gastrin which stimulates the flow of hydrochloric acid. This reflex then goes down and helps with liver and gallbladder secretions of bile and pancreatic enzyme secretions.  Experts believe that the bitter reflex helps to improve the structure and function of all the digestive organs.
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