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Once you’re done with your meal prep, make sure you let your meals cool down before transferring them to airtight containers and storing them in the fridge, but make sure you don’t keep your food in room temperature for more than two hours. If you are using meal prep containers and have stored your cooked meal prep well, it can last in the fridge for up to 7 days.  Some foods will keep longer than others, which is something to consider when prepping 7 days at a time.
Some juicing proponents say that juicing is better for you than is eating whole fruits and vegetables because your body can absorb the nutrients better and it gives your digestive system a rest from working on fiber. They say that juicing can reduce your risk of cancer, boost your immune system, help remove toxins from your body, aid digestion and help you lose weight.
Protein: A macronutrient responsible for many processes in your body, including the health of your bones and muscles and the quick response of your immune system. A juice-based diet may result in symptoms of anemia, weakness and leave you open to infection. Even if you’re considering a juice cleanse only for the short-term, be aware of these potential risks.

Juicing tools have been used throughout history. Manual devices include barrel-shaped presses, hand-operated grinders, and inverted cones upon which fruit is mashed and twisted. Modern juicers are powered by electric motors generating from 200 to 1000 or more watts. There are several types of electric juicers: masticating, centrifugal, and triturating juicers. These variations are defined by the means of extracting the juice.
Hi there, it’s Lacey! I’m the editor and main writer for A Sweet Pea Chef. I'm a food blogger, health and food coach, professional photographer, and mommy of three. I also run the awesome free Take Back Your Health Community, am the healthy and clean weekly meal planner behind No-Fail Meals, and a little bit in love with Clean Eating. Be sure to check out my free beginner’s guide to eating clean and follow me on YouTube and Instagram to get my latest recipes and healthy eating inspiration. Read More…
For many people, food is a chore, a challenge, even a source of dread, as they try to overcome poor eating habits. But eating should be a joy and a centerpiece of family life. Many cultures around the world emphasize the enjoyment of food, which includes cooking and eating with others, as an integral component of good health. The latest Dietary Guidelines say that eating healthfully involves “enjoying food and celebrating cultural and personal traditions through food.” According to some research, shared mealtimes, especially during childhood, may help protect against nutrition-related health problems as well as increase prosocial behavior in adulthood.

If a bottle of juice has two servings and 20 grams of sugar per serving, that’s 40 grams of sugar in one juice! One of the key recommendations from the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is to consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from added sugar. Beverages, including 100 percent fruit juice, count for almost half of all added sugars consumed by Americans.

This meal prep is designed so you spend 60-90 minutes cooking on sunday or monday, and you have at least 5 healthy meals done for the week. I say at least, because the breakfast meal prep recipes can last 2-3 days, especially the frittata. There is nothing like finishing your weekly meal prep and knowing that you have a bunch of healthy and tasty meals to help you lose weight.
Soluble fiber will make it to your juice. Soluble fiber is 'soluble' in water. Soluble fiber (like gums and pectins) will partially dissolve in water and form a type of gel. Soluble fiber absorbs digestive bile made by cholesterol, which creates even more digestive bile, which then helps to lower LDL (bad) cholesterol. Soluble fiber also can help moderate your blood glucose levels because it helps sugar to be more slowly absorbed, which is why some diabetics report juicing to be helpful to them.
One of the best ways to have a healthy diet is to prepare your own food and eat in regularly. Pick a few healthy recipes that you and your family like and build a meal schedule around them. If you have three or four meals planned per week and eat leftovers on the other nights, you will be much farther ahead than if you are eating out or having frozen dinners most nights.
Obesity is not the only nutrition-related cause of disease onset and progression. Too much or too little of certain nutrients can also contribute to health issues. For instance, a lack of calcium in your diet can predispose you to developing osteoporosis, or weakening of your bones, while too much saturated fat can cause cardiovascular disease, and too few fruits and vegetables in your nutrition plan is associated with an increased incidence of cancer. Consuming foods from a wide variety of sources helps ensure your body has the nutrients it needs to avoid these health problems.

Personalized nutrition consultations are Karyn’s specialty. Her approach is based on her innate ability to meet her clients wherever they’re at. She has been in practice for 11 years: 2 years of private practice and, most recently, 9 years with One Medical. Karyn has completed all advanced practice modules with the Institute of Functional Medicine and can clarify optimum dietary and lifestyle approaches specific to your health status. As a certified natural chef, Karyn can cite recipes on the fly and provide menu plans and practical tips to ensure you’re truly enjoying making healthy food choices. She studied with behavior design guru Dr. B. J. Fogg to understand how best to facilitate behavior change — a vital tactic for clients who know exactly what they should do but have difficulty implementing their best intentions. Healthy shouldn’t be hard. Karyn makes it easy and convenient and works with clients remotely, so rather than having to get yourself to an appointment, she can "meet" you in your office or your kitchen — wherever you’re at and whatever’s easiest for you. For more information please visit karynforsythduggan.com and/or e-mail karyn@karynforsythduggan.com
Insoluble fiber is the left-over pulp after juicing. Only a small amount of this makes it to your juice. If you were to mix insoluble fiber in a glass of water, it would sink to the bottom, absorb the water and puff up. If you imagine that moving through your body, you can picture what it does for you. It's beneficial to help get things 'moving' and prevents constipation.
For many people, food is a chore, a challenge, even a source of dread, as they try to overcome poor eating habits. But eating should be a joy and a centerpiece of family life. Many cultures around the world emphasize the enjoyment of food, which includes cooking and eating with others, as an integral component of good health. The latest Dietary Guidelines say that eating healthfully involves “enjoying food and celebrating cultural and personal traditions through food.” According to some research, shared mealtimes, especially during childhood, may help protect against nutrition-related health problems as well as increase prosocial behavior in adulthood.
We're finding that way too many people are replacing multiple meals with just 1 glass of juice, and "feeling light-headed for some reason". Being healthy and losing weight doesn't mean eating less, it means eating right. Anyone can lose weight by starving themselves. Don't do this, no one said to do this. Alright, maybe some fad diets say to do this, but they're terrible and that's why they're fad diets.
I divided this recipe collection by type (chicken recipes, fish and seafood recipes, meat recipes, and one lone vegetarian recipe at the end) and, where appropriate, I’ve made a note about any special diet they fall under (paleo, whole 30, dairy free, gluten free.) As always if you follow a special diet, please check your product labels to ensure there are no hidden ingredients.
Even more important than shopping for healthy foods: actually eating them. When you get home from the store or farmer's market, bounty of fruits and veggies in tow, wash and chop them right away and store in a pretty glass container in your fridge. "Studies show that spending more time on food prep is linked to better eating habits," says Dr. Lipman. It's all about convenience—if they're ready for you, you'll grab them in a pinch. If not? It's chips and dip time. You can also do this with other foods, like making a batch of quinoa for the week or roasting a bunch of veggies to throw together for quick lunches.
You’ve heard it before, and it’s true: breakfast is the most important meal of the day. Eating a healthy breakfast is absolutely crucial to help kickstart metabolism, improve cognitive function, and help you make better food choices throughout the day. The ideal meal includes protein, healthy fat, and some complex carbohydrates (read more about PFC here).
What counts as a family meal? Whenever you and your family eat together — whether it's takeout food or a home-cooked meal with all the trimmings. Strive for nutritious food and a time when everyone can be there. This may mean eating dinner a little later to accommodate a teen who's at sports practice. It also can mean setting aside time on the weekends when it may be more convenient to gather as a group, such as for Sunday brunch.

This strategy is not only unhealthy — it nearly always backfires. If you don’t eat enough calories throughout the day, you’ll be more likely to overindulge at night. When you focus your efforts all day on skimping on food, you set yourself up for an eating binge later on. And instead of sitting down to a healthy evening meal, you’re more likely to reward yourself for being so “good” all day by reaching for a calorie-bomb like a pint of ice cream or piece of cake.


When your body realizes it’s not getting enough protein, it begins to extract it from your muscles. This results in you beginning to lose muscle mass. Losing muscle mass is not the same as losing fat — you may feel weaker, struggle with your balance, and feel aches and pains. Losing muscle mass is not good for anyone, but it has worse consequences the older you are.
Some advocates for juicing may claim that your body absorbs more nutrients from juices than the whole fruit because the fruit’s fiber gets in the way. However, there isn’t much research out there that supports that claim. Your digestive system is designed to handle fiber and extract nutrients from a variety of foods. Plus, fiber is important for digestive function and has a multitude of health benefits.

The Dietary Guidelines state that that intake of at least 2 ½ cups of vegetables and fruits per day is associated with a reduced risk of cardiovascular disease, including heart attack and stroke. In addition, fruits and vegetables contain more fiber when eaten whole, which may reduce your risk of obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease. Fiber can also play a role in providing a feeling of fullness, and promoting healthy laxation. Most Americans don’t consume enough dietary fiber, and should increase their consumption of whole fruits and vegetables to help meet the recommendation for fiber. Since juicing fruits and vegetables can sometimes remove some of the fiber, it is not clear what the relationship is between juicing and health. If you choose to juice, try adding the leftover pulp from your juice to soups or muffins to help add the fiber into your diet.
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