It’s a scientific fact that the digestion of liquids (like juice) occurs significantly more quickly than digestion of solid foods. This means that all that fructose sugar you’re putting into one place and consuming in a short period of time is being digested and absorbed far more quickly than if you had eaten its solid, fiber-filled counterpart (e.g. chomped on an apple or a carrot).


These foods—notably vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains—should supply about 20 to 35 grams of dietary fiber a day, depending on your calorie needs. (Aim for 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories, as advised by the  Dietary Guidelines for Americans.) Fiber slows the absorption of carbohydrates, so they have less effect on insulin and blood sugar, and it provides other health benefits. Try to fill three-quarters of your plate with produce, legumes, and whole grains—leaving only one-quarter for meat, poultry, or other protein sources.
If all you have time for is a quick snack from the gas station or drugstore, know that you do have options, and if you know what you're looking for, it will be easier to find. When we asked registered dietitians to recommend snacks to buy at the drugstore, they tended to go for things like nuts and seeds that pack plenty of flavor (hi, wasabi chickpeas), plenty of protein, and not a whole lot else.
If a bottle of juice has two servings and 20 grams of sugar per serving, that’s 40 grams of sugar in one juice! One of the key recommendations from the 2015-2020 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is to consume less than 10 percent of calories per day from added sugar. Beverages, including 100 percent fruit juice, count for almost half of all added sugars consumed by Americans.
I typically plan on making meals for 3-4 days during my meal prep sessions, depending upon the protein I’m using. If I’m using seafood, I never go more than 3 days, and sometimes just do 2 day’s worth. For chicken and beef, I prep for 3-4 days at a time. I keep certain components like sauces separate until I’m ready to eat so that the food doesn’t get soggy in the fridge.
Juice separates the juice from the pulp whereas a smoothie includes everything. The pulp is full of nutrients so it stands to reason that smoothies contain more nutrients. This oft-argued point is not necessarily true, because the high powered machine that makes a smoothie adds heat and oxygen which actually destroys some nutrients. So the difference in nutritional richness between a smoothie and a juice is not worth arguing. They are both worlds better than anything bottled or canned!
In addition to the quality of the foods you consume, the quantity matters when considering good eating habits. Taking in the same number of calories as you burn ensures your weight remains steady over time. Consuming more than you burn, on the other hand, results in weight gain as your body converts extra calories to fat tissue. When you accumulate fat tissue, you increase your risk of developing one or more health problems, including heart disease, hypertension, respiratory issues, diabetes and cancer. A healthy meal plan without excess calories helps you not only feel better but can prolong your life.
“Juicing may be the fastest and easiest way to get in nutrients from the vegetables you’d rather skip at dinner,” Sharp says of the kales, celeries, spinaches, and other often-dissed veggies. “If you have a juice with a meal or otherwise, make sure you supplement with fiber to make up for what’s lost in the juicing process if you don’t leave the peel on.” (May we suggest a nice bed of lentils?)
There are two ways you can think about 80/20 eating. One: eat healthy 80% of the time and save 20% for splurges. That's great because it stresses how eating is not about perfection, and as we mentioned earlier, how it can be pleasurable, too. However, what does that really look like? That might mean having a 150-calorie treat daily, like Schapiro does, or saving it all up for a big meal out on the weekend. Make it work for you rather than stressing out about percentages.
While there are many pasteurized, ready-to-drink options in the grocery store, it’s important that you check the ingredient list thoroughly before purchase. Many mass-produced juice blends go heavy on the fruit over vegetables, as the sweetness makes their product more palatable. The pasteurization process reduces the overall nutrition benefits, as many of the enzymes die off in the heating process.
Ginger: Ginger is classified as a carminative (reducing intestinal gas) and an intestinal spasmolytic (soothes intestinal tract) while inducing gut motility. Ginger is known to reduce fever related nausea, motion sickness, and feelings of “morning sickness.” Additionally, it helps aid in the production of bile, making it particularly helpful in digesting fats (16, 17).

The nutrients in the foods you eat support the activities of day-to-day living, protect your cells from environmental damage and repair any cellular damage that might occur. Protein rebuilds injured tissue and promotes a healthy immune system. Both carbohydrates and fats fuel your body, while vitamins and minerals function throughout your body in support of your body’s processes. Vitamins A, C and E, for example, act as antioxidants to protect your cells against toxins, and B vitamins help you extract energy from the foods you eat. Calcium and phosphorus keep your bones strong, while sodium and potassium help to transmit nerve signals. Without a healthy diet, you might compromise any of these essential functions.
The latest Dietary Guidelines no longer give a daily cap for dietary cholesterol (previously it was 300 milligrams), because there’s abundant evidence that dietary cholesterol (found only in animal foods) has little if any effect on most people's blood cholesterol. Rather, saturated fats raise LDL (“bad”) cholesterol more than dietary cholesterol does. But don't go overboard with cholesterol-rich foods, since many of them are also high in saturated fats. And if you have cardiovascular disease or diabetes, ask your doctor if you should limit dietary cholesterol.

During phase one and two of liver detoxification, your liver converts fat-soluble toxins into water-soluble substances. Phase three is when the toxins are excreted from the body — but your liver requires amino acids, normally made from protein, to excrete the toxins. When you are on a raw juice detox, you can’t make these amino acids as easily. This results in more toxins in your bloodstream, instead of fewer.
Obesity is not the only nutrition-related cause of disease onset and progression. Too much or too little of certain nutrients can also contribute to health issues. For instance, a lack of calcium in your diet can predispose you to developing osteoporosis, or weakening of your bones, while too much saturated fat can cause cardiovascular disease, and too few fruits and vegetables in your nutrition plan is associated with an increased incidence of cancer. Consuming foods from a wide variety of sources helps ensure your body has the nutrients it needs to avoid these health problems.
These foods—notably vegetables, fruits, legumes, and whole grains—should supply about 20 to 35 grams of dietary fiber a day, depending on your calorie needs. (Aim for 14 grams of fiber for every 1,000 calories, as advised by the  Dietary Guidelines for Americans.) Fiber slows the absorption of carbohydrates, so they have less effect on insulin and blood sugar, and it provides other health benefits. Try to fill three-quarters of your plate with produce, legumes, and whole grains—leaving only one-quarter for meat, poultry, or other protein sources.
Putting down the salt shaker and skipping sugar in your coffee is a step in the right direction, but that’s not where most people get the majority of their salt and sugar. Sodium and sugar are rampant in most packaged foods from pasta sauce and mac and cheese to rice mixes and soups. Start by checking the nutrition label on your breakfast cereal (some pack up to 20 grams of sugar per serving!).
I always used to struggle with meal prep for the work week because I had trouble planning ahead and let's just say this was long before I discovered blogging as a hobby or even as a reader! I used to rely primarily on cookbooks to whip together delicious dinners but would then struggle when it came to getting my lunches together for work and school.
Wow…so good. Very tasty! 02/04/18…made this again and I always make in crock pot on high for 5/6 hours. I couldn’t find boneless at the time. The meat falls off the bone. I use all ingredients and add garlic and they are so good. I’m making again and again. People do not freeze unless You are making ahead of time and Do Not put Frozen in crock pot!!!! Thaw out in refrigerator first, then place in crock pot or Dutch oven pot which ever you are you using. I use a Crock-Pot. Alot of people have large families or a party to prepare for. That all it’s saying. ??
This strategy is not only unhealthy — it nearly always backfires. If you don’t eat enough calories throughout the day, you’ll be more likely to overindulge at night. When you focus your efforts all day on skimping on food, you set yourself up for an eating binge later on. And instead of sitting down to a healthy evening meal, you’re more likely to reward yourself for being so “good” all day by reaching for a calorie-bomb like a pint of ice cream or piece of cake.
If you buy fresh squeezed juice from a store or juicing stand, be aware that these may contain harmful bacteria if they have not been pasteurized, or treated to kill harmful bacteria. Unpasteurized (raw) juices are not recommended for those at risk for foodborne illness, such as children, the elderly, and people with weakened immune systems. Those at risk should look for a warning label before purchasing. More information about food safety can be found on the Food Safety Education page of the FSIS website, or Nutrition.gov’s Food Storage and Preservation page under Shopping, Cooking and Meal Planning.
For the frittata, pre-heat oven to 400 F. Pre-heat an oven safe 6-8 inch non-stick pan over medium heat with 2 teaspoons of oil. Add the onions, bell peppers, ¼ teaspoon salt, and a couple cracks of pepper. Cook for 5 minutes then add the kale, cook for another 3 minutes until kale has wilted down. Whisk the eggs vigorously, turn the heat down to medium-low, and add the eggs. Use a spatula to mix everything very well and continue mixing to break up any large chunks of eggs. Once the eggs have come together a little, but the mixture is still very wet, transfer the pan to the oven and cook for 7 minutes. Remove from oven and use a clean spatula to carefully remove the frittata from the pan. Sprinkle with parsley and enjoy. Frittata will keep in the fridge for 3 days or can be frozen for 2 months. Re-heat in a 400 F oven for 5-10 minutes or if using the microwave, place a wet paper towel over the container and make sure not to over-heat or the eggs will get rubbery.

Food containers come in all shapes, sizes and equally important – materials. Depending on your lifestyle, you can pick the ones that fit into your lifestyle (and your bag!) best. If you’ll be taking a lot of your meals with you on the go, the slimmer and lighter the container is, the better. Also, make sure the container is suitable for keeping in the freezer and/or microwave use, depending on what you’ll be using it most – that’s why I love these glass meal prep containers. There are plenty of options and after you’ve done your planning, it will be much easier for you to determine what kind of container is the best option.
Bok Choy: This is a water rich cruciferous vegetable that contains over 70 different phenolic anti-oxidants and major electrolytes. One of the most powerful phenolic compounds in bok choy is hydroxycinnamic acids which are referred to in the literature as “chain breaking” anti-oxidants due to its way of scavenging free radicals. This is why bok choy is being studied for its cancer prevention ability (5).
Celebrate Friday with a family-friendly dinner that comes together easily. A kid-friendly mix of quality convenience items and bright produce imparts fresh taste with minimal legwork. A probiotic-rich stand-in for sour cream, yogurt offers creaminess and helps bind the toppings. Rotisserie chicken, one of the most versatile supermarket proteins, makes for a fast and fresh meal. Look for BBQ sauce varieties with less than 250mg sodium and 5g sugar. We like Annie's Original BBQ Sauce.
There's a lot of advice out there on how to eat healthy, and if we're being honest, it can sometimes feel like too much to think about. Especially when you're hungry (AKA always). Remember when you were a kid and eating was as simple as open, chew, enjoy? Yes, those were simpler times. Now, knowing how to eat healthy doesn't seem quite as straightforward. Between the diet fads, gourmet trends, and a rotating roster of superfoods, eating well has gotten, well, complicated.
Juicing removes the fiber content of the fruit or vegetable, and the full benefits of the plant is thus not experienced.[4] Re-adding fiber to the juice cannot be equated to whole fruits.[5] There is a loss in non-extracted polyphenols, a class of phytonutrients, in fruit juice compared to whole plant foods.[6] Most polyphenols are bound to the plant fibers, and constitute the major portion of dietary polyphenols.[7] There is therefore a marked loss of phytonutrients in consuming fruits and vegetables through the juicing process alone.[8]
For many people, food is a chore, a challenge, even a source of dread, as they try to overcome poor eating habits. But eating should be a joy and a centerpiece of family life. Many cultures around the world emphasize the enjoyment of food, which includes cooking and eating with others, as an integral component of good health. The latest Dietary Guidelines say that eating healthfully involves “enjoying food and celebrating cultural and personal traditions through food.” According to some research, shared mealtimes, especially during childhood, may help protect against nutrition-related health problems as well as increase prosocial behavior in adulthood.

SS: A juice cleanse may result in short-term weight loss, which may be due to diuresis [the increased production of urine] versus true weight loss. I would not recommend it as an effective, long-term way to lose weight because drinking solely juice is not sustainable. Additionally, when you deprive the body of its favorite foods for an extended period of time you’re more likely to overeat and overindulge — and as a result regain the weight — once you return to your everyday eating habits.

Maintaining metabolic alkalinity has been proven to decrease overall net muscle acidity, allowing athletes to address these issues. The problem is that common juicing practitioners do not pay attention to the ingredients, and do not create alkalizing recipes. Most of the common juicing fruits discussed earlier do not actually create alkalinity in your body. So the only fruits that should really be juiced as a staple are lemons and limes, as they are some of the most alkalizing foods that exist. You can click here to view an acid/alkaline chart which shows a few more of the mostly alkalinic fruits.
One of the best ways to have a healthy diet is to prepare your own food and eat in regularly. Pick a few healthy recipes that you and your family like and build a meal schedule around them. If you have three or four meals planned per week and eat leftovers on the other nights, you will be much farther ahead than if you are eating out or having frozen dinners most nights.
While there are many pasteurized, ready-to-drink options in the grocery store, it’s important that you check the ingredient list thoroughly before purchase. Many mass-produced juice blends go heavy on the fruit over vegetables, as the sweetness makes their product more palatable. The pasteurization process reduces the overall nutrition benefits, as many of the enzymes die off in the heating process.

There is more than one way to eat healthfully and everyone has their own eating style. Make healthier choices that reflect your preferences, culture, traditions, and budget. Choose fruits, vegetables, grains, dairy, and protein foods to get the most nutrition and meet your personal calorie needs. Aim for a variety of foods and beverages from each food group and limit saturated fat, sodium, and added sugars.
×