The saturated fats in animal foods generally boost levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and have other adverse effects. To limit your intake, choose lean meats, skinless poultry, and nonfat or low-fat dairy products. It’s also a good idea to replace saturated fats with unsaturated fats (see next slide). Keep in mind, though, that not all saturated fats are bad for you; those in chocolate, milk, and cheese, for example, are more neutral in their effect on blood cholesterol. Trans fats from partially hydrogenated oils are even worse than saturated fats, but FDA regulations have now nearly phased them out of the food supply.
Prepare more of your own meals. Cooking more meals at home can help you take charge of what you’re eating and better monitor exactly what goes into your food. You’ll eat fewer calories and avoid the chemical additives, added sugar, and unhealthy fats of packaged and takeout foods that can leave you feeling tired, bloated, and irritable, and exacerbate symptoms of depression, stress, and anxiety.

First things first – planning. Before you start to prep your meals, you need a nice, solid plan. Coming up with a meal plan may sound overwhelming at first, but it’s not as bad as it may seem. Just take it one step at a time and start with one, simple meal you love and that you know is healthy, and then work your way up. Soon, you’ll be prepping all your meals! Watch out – it gets addicting!


My husband and I made the chicken caprese and the korean chicken bowls last week for our lunch prep and we both loved them! The fresh ingredients are so yummy! I am an RN who works in the operating room and I got tired of paying for the cafeteria lunches (unhealthy and always the same old stuff). Last week we prepped our lunches and it was fantastic to have a gourmet meal at lunch every day. Thanks for the great recipes~ I am off to prep for the week !

We eat out way too much because often making meals at home becomes overwhelming with my wife and I’s busy work schedules. This post was very helpful in providing some nice suggtions for making preparing meals more feasible. I appreciated the ones you selected had portioning taken into consideration too. We have to work on portioning as well as healthier ingredients when it comes to what our family is eating. Very nice article…thank you!

For the shakshuka, pre-heat oven to 450 F. Pre-heat an oven safe 8-9 inch pan over medium-high heat along with 2 teaspoons of oil. Add the red peppers, onions, garlic, ¼ teaspoon salt, and a few cracks of pepper. Mix well and cook for 5 minutes. Add the kale and cook another 2 minutes. Place the tomatoes in a food processor or blender, and pulse until it looks like a can of chopped tomatoes, making sure not to turn it into a smooth puree(or use canned chopped tomatoes). Add the tomatoes to the pan and cook over medium heat for 6-8 minutes, or until the consistency has thickened up and it’s not so watery and loose. Add the agave nectar, turn the heat off, and stir well. Use a spoon to make two dimples the eggs can sit in, and carefully cracks the eggs into the pan. Transfer the pan to the oven and cook for 5-7 minutes until the eggs are set. Remove from oven, garnish with parsley, and enjoy. Shakshuka will keep in the fridge for 3 days and can be warmed in a 400 F oven for 7 minutes or in the microwave.

Prepare more of your own meals. Cooking more meals at home can help you take charge of what you’re eating and better monitor exactly what goes into your food. You’ll eat fewer calories and avoid the chemical additives, added sugar, and unhealthy fats of packaged and takeout foods that can leave you feeling tired, bloated, and irritable, and exacerbate symptoms of depression, stress, and anxiety.
Prepare more of your own meals. Cooking more meals at home can help you take charge of what you’re eating and better monitor exactly what goes into your food. You’ll eat fewer calories and avoid the chemical additives, added sugar, and unhealthy fats of packaged and takeout foods that can leave you feeling tired, bloated, and irritable, and exacerbate symptoms of depression, stress, and anxiety.

Excess sodium, found in many processed foods and restaurant meals, raises blood pressure in some people and can have other adverse effects. The Dietary Guidelines recommend a limit of 2,300 milligrams a day for the general population; people with hypertension or prehypertension can benefit from a further reduction to 1,500 milligrams per day. As you cut back on sodium, eat more potassium-rich foods, which help lower blood pressure. These include citrus fruits, bananas, beans, avocados, some fish, and dairy products.


For the lunch salad, to a large bowl add the kale, tomatoes, bell pepper, walnuts, raisins, ¼ teaspoon salt, and pepper to a large bowl. Add the vinegar, olive oil, and mix very well. After re-heating the chicken, slice thin and add to the salad. Serve and enjoy. Salad should not be dressed until right before eating, or can be dressed a few hours ahead of time because kale doesn’t get wilted very easily.
For the stir fry, drain the shirataki noodles well and place in a non-stick pan. Cook over medium heat for 8 minutes so the excess moisture can evaporate, you know the noodles are ready when the bottom of the pan is white and dry. Remove noodles from pan, roughly chop them a couple times and set aside. Pre-heat a large non-stick pan over medium-high heat for 2 minutes. Add 2 teaspoons of oil along with the onions, bell peppers, and green beans. Cook for 5 minutes and then add the garlic. Cook for 1 minute and then whisk the eggs very well and add to the pan. Lower the heat to medium and stir well to break up the eggs, once they have scrambled add the noodles to the pan and mix well. Add 1 tablespoon of amino acid, 1 teaspoon of sriracha, and ½ teaspoon of toasted sesame oil. Mix well and check for seasoning, you may need more of the sauces. Lower the heat to low, slice the cooked chicken, and add to the pan. Remove from heat, serve and enjoy. Stir fry will keep in the fridge for 3 days, but can’t be frozen. The best way to re-heat is in a hot non-stick pan or if using the microwave, place a wet paper towel over the container and make sure not to over-heat or the food will get dry.
Some advocates for juicing may claim that your body absorbs more nutrients from juices than the whole fruit because the fruit’s fiber gets in the way. However, there isn’t much research out there that supports that claim. Your digestive system is designed to handle fiber and extract nutrients from a variety of foods. Plus, fiber is important for digestive function and has a multitude of health benefits.

Another way to be a good role model is to serve appropriate portions and not overeat. Talk about your feelings of fullness, especially with younger children. You might say, "This is delicious, but I'm full, so I'm going to stop eating." Similarly, parents who are always dieting or complaining about their bodies may foster these same negative feelings in their kids. Try to keep a positive approach about food.
“Of course, juice is not free of sugar and calories,” Sharp says. “But compared to soda and other sweetened beverages like sports drinks, it has more nutrient density without added sugar and preservatives.” Basically, if you have to choose between a vodka Coke and a screwdriver (vodka with orange juice), pick the latter. And make sure the juice is fresh, since carton juices can pack just as much sugar as the soda.
Obesity is not the only nutrition-related cause of disease onset and progression. Too much or too little of certain nutrients can also contribute to health issues. For instance, a lack of calcium in your diet can predispose you to developing osteoporosis, or weakening of your bones, while too much saturated fat can cause cardiovascular disease, and too few fruits and vegetables in your nutrition plan is associated with an increased incidence of cancer. Consuming foods from a wide variety of sources helps ensure your body has the nutrients it needs to avoid these health problems.
Brain iron deficiency should be one of the first considerations when looking for a cause of restless legs syndrome (RLS). However, many doctors don’t know that iron deficiency is one cause of RLS, and therefore don’t test for it, particularly in men, in whom iron deficiency is uncommon. Diagnosing low brain iron is tricky, because doctors have to infer it from blood levels. Several tests are used to measure iron in the blood. The most important for diagnosing iron deficiency measures ferritin, the primary form of stored iron in the blood. (Locked) More »

To set yourself up for success, try to keep things simple. Eating a healthier diet doesn’t have to be complicated. Instead of being overly concerned with counting calories, for example, think of your diet in terms of color, variety, and freshness. Focus on avoiding packaged and processed foods and opting for more fresh ingredients whenever possible.


Eating a plant-based diet is linked to lower risk of heart disease, stroke and some cancers. But only one in 10 Americans gets their daily recommended 5-7 servings of vegetables and fruit. Juicing is a fun and easy way to add more fresh produce to your diet. Juicing a variety of vegetables and fruit can also provide more vitamins and nutrients than eating one type of produce.
Between work and the gym, I’ve been getting home pretty late these days. Even though I love to cook, it’s usually just about the last thing I want to do when I finally walk through the door. I’ve been making a lot of healthy sheet pan dinners, and I really love how easy they are. Most of these healthy dinner recipes take only a few minutes of prep and then the oven does the work. And since everything for these easy recipes cooks together on one pan, cleanup is a breeze! Line your pan with foil or parchment for even easier cleanup.
1. Add fats to your juice recipes for healthy and long-lasting energy. A one-ounce serving of chia seeds provides the body with 5 grams of Omega 3-fatty acids. It also helps with brain health, improving mental clarity and focus. Chia seeds also provide the body with a lot of anti-oxidants, protecting you from the free radicals generated during exercise. Other examples of fats that you can add to your juice include olive oil, liquid EPA oil, MCT oil, coconut oil, cod liver oil, and even butter or ghee!
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