The saturated fats in animal foods generally boost levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and have other adverse effects. To limit your intake, choose lean meats, skinless poultry, and nonfat or low-fat dairy products. It’s also a good idea to replace saturated fats with unsaturated fats (see next slide). Keep in mind, though, that not all saturated fats are bad for you; those in chocolate, milk, and cheese, for example, are more neutral in their effect on blood cholesterol. Trans fats from partially hydrogenated oils are even worse than saturated fats, but FDA regulations have now nearly phased them out of the food supply.
In this round up, we've got everything from Caprese Chicken bowls to Cashew Chicken, Thai Yellow Curry, Greek Chicken and even a few vegetarian options like Chickpea Bowls. You can make these healthy meal prep lunch ideas on a sheet pan, on the BBQ, in a skillet or choose a couple of the no-cook recipes to try out while you get used to meal prepping on the weekend. 

Sure, you don't know what you'll be in the mood for later, and will you even be hungry? Yes, probably. After all, increased snacking is one reason behind the rise in calorie intake over the past few decades, according to a 2011 study in PLOS ONE. "When you leave your office to go find something, that's when bad choices are made," says Schapiro. "That's when a hot pretzel, bag of candy, or donut can look very appealing." Make sure your desk (or fridge) is stocked with an emergency stash of snacks, like Greek yogurt, individual packs of nuts, dried fruit, and nitrate-free jerky.
Bok Choy: This is a water rich cruciferous vegetable that contains over 70 different phenolic anti-oxidants and major electrolytes. One of the most powerful phenolic compounds in bok choy is hydroxycinnamic acids which are referred to in the literature as “chain breaking” anti-oxidants due to its way of scavenging free radicals. This is why bok choy is being studied for its cancer prevention ability (5).
Did you know that above ground vegetables, particularly greens, contain anti-nutrients that can be potentially harmful at large doses. If you think about it, it makes sense. Plants want to survive so the parts that animals can see (above ground) contain some toxins to make them less appealing. This includes goitrogens, polyphenols, tannins, lectins, oxalates, etc. In small quantities, these are absolutely fine and even beneficial. However, when we juice, we need to use large quantities of these greens to actually create juice which can cause problems in some people.
Once you’re done with your meal prep, make sure you let your meals cool down before transferring them to airtight containers and storing them in the fridge, but make sure you don’t keep your food in room temperature for more than two hours. If you are using meal prep containers and have stored your cooked meal prep well, it can last in the fridge for up to 7 days.  Some foods will keep longer than others, which is something to consider when prepping 7 days at a time.
High amounts of these veggies have caused hypothyroidism in animals, according to Oregon State University’s Linus Pauling Institute. One 88-year-old woman lapsed into a coma after eating 3 pounds (or 2 cups of juice) per day of raw bok choy for several months, according to the institute. But researchers aren’t sure if her condition was caused by the bok choy or another problem, such as an autoimmune disease.
An important take-home message is to focus on the types of foods you eat and your overall dietary pattern, instead of on individual nutrients such as fat, dietary cholesterol, or specific vitamins. There are no single nutrients or vitamins that can make you healthy. Instead, there is a short list of key food types that together can dramatically reduce your risk for heart disease.

The saturated fats in animal foods generally boost levels of LDL (“bad”) cholesterol and have other adverse effects. To limit your intake, choose lean meats, skinless poultry, and nonfat or low-fat dairy products. It’s also a good idea to replace saturated fats with unsaturated fats (see next slide). Keep in mind, though, that not all saturated fats are bad for you; those in chocolate, milk, and cheese, for example, are more neutral in their effect on blood cholesterol. Trans fats from partially hydrogenated oils are even worse than saturated fats, but FDA regulations have now nearly phased them out of the food supply.
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